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Eye Conditions

The following is a list of common eye conditions. For information about cataracts, glaucoma, macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy please see Eye Diseases.

  • Glaucoma is a leading cause of preventable vision loss and blindness in adults in the United States and Canada and the second leading cause of blindness in the World.
  • Commonly called "lazy eye", amblyopia can be treated successfully if detected early enough in childhood.
  • Often mistakenly called “stigmatism,” this common vision problem can be corrected with eyeglasses, contact lenses or refractive surgery.
  • Red, swollen eyelids and crusty debris at the base of your eyelashes are signs you may have blepharitis.
  • AIDS or other diseases that affect your immune system can increase your risk of serious eye problems from cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection.
  • People with serious vision problems from an eye injury or disease affecting the front surface of the eye can often regain vision with a cornea transplant.
  • Dry eye syndrome is a common condition, especially in women over age 40. Many treatment options are available.
  • Are you bothered by red, itchy eyes? You may have allergies.
  • “Floaters” are usually normal and harmless. But if you notice a sudden increase in floaters or floaters accompanied by flashes of light, see your eye doctor immediately.
  • Also called farsightedness, hyperopia is a common vision problem that can cause headaches, eyestrain and trouble reading.
  • This eye disease causes the cornea to grow thinner and bulge forward in an irregular cone-shape. Treatment options range from gas permeable contact lenses to a cornea transplant.
  • Also called nearsightedness, myopia is a very common vision problem, affecting up to one-third of the U.S. population.
  • You’ve heard of high blood pressure, but what about high eye pressure?
  • This acute and contagious form of conjunctivitis is particularly common among preschoolers and school-age children.
  • These inherited disorders, commonly abbreviated as RP, cause progressive peripheral vision loss, night blindness and central vision loss.
  • This common problem is simply an infected lid gland. Learn how to prevent and treat styes.

In an effort to further protect our patients and staff, we are taking the following precautions at our office:

When you arrive in the office for your appointment:

  1. The door will remain locked and open only for patients that have been initially screened
  2. Careful Screening:  All persons entering the office will be screened for symptoms of COVID-19 by 1) being asked a series of screening questions and 2) their temperature will be taken before entering the office.  If the patient's temperature is greater or equal to 100.4 degrees F (38 degrees C), that person will be denied entrance and asked to see their primary care physician.
  3. No additional family, friends, etc will be allowed to accompany the patient into the office
    1. *Exception: children and others requiring assistance - 1 single parent or accompanied guardian allowed
  4. We ask that you please wear cloth or medical MASKS when entering our office. A mask will be required for entry through the door.
  5.  We will be implementing a *$50 “No Show Fee”* for no shows or cancellations if we are not notified at least 24 hours prior to your scheduled appointment.

Safety and Sanitization Precautions:

Frame Selections, Adjustments, Repairs and Dispensing:

 

Although there may be some changes to your normal visit to our office, we assure you that we are doing our best to follow all CDC, California Department of Public Health, California Optometric Association and local public health guidelines to keep our patients, staff and community safe without compromising our standard of excellence and quality during this time.

We ask that you all are mindful of the following precautions. We are all in this together. We look forward to SEEing you all soon!

Aloha Family Optometric Team