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Phoropter

If, during an eye examination, your doctor has discovered a vision problem like nearsightedness, farsightedness or astigmatism, it’s likely that one of the next steps you’ll take will involve a phoropter. A phoropter is special machine used to switch multiple lenses in front of your eyes to correct your vision.

Phoropters look imposing—like space-age visors—but are really an ingenious way to quickly determine the exact vision correction needed by your individual eyes.

By having you look through the phoropter at a visual reference, image, or the “Big E” chart (the Snellen chart), your eye doctor will help guide you toward lenses that correct your vision impairment by switching lenses within the machine on the fly.

How does a phoropter work?

The process of switching lenses in front of your eyes is less involved than it may look, given the imposing nature of the device. A phoropter is used to manually determine “refraction”—exactly how a lens must be shaped and curved to correct your vision to a normal state, nothing more.

Phoropters are subjective however, based on your visual perception and response to your eye doctor’s questions. Is your vision better, or worse? With this lens, or this lens? How about now?

There are other procedures and technologies available that automatically measure the refraction needed within your eye and produce a “prescription” measurement without your input. These are called autorefractors and aberrometers.

 

Special thanks to the EyeGlass Guide, for informational material that aided in the creation of this website. Visit the EyeGlass Guide today!

In an effort to further protect our patients and staff, we are taking the following precautions at our office:

When you arrive in the office for your appointment:

  1. The door will remain locked and open only for patients that have been initially screened
  2. Careful Screening:  All persons entering the office will be screened for symptoms of COVID-19 by 1) being asked a series of screening questions and 2) their temperature will be taken before entering the office.  If the patient's temperature is greater or equal to 100.4 degrees F (38 degrees C), that person will be denied entrance and asked to see their primary care physician.
  3. No additional family, friends, etc will be allowed to accompany the patient into the office
    1. *Exception: children and others requiring assistance - 1 single parent or accompanied guardian allowed
  4. We ask that you please wear cloth or medical MASKS when entering our office. A mask will be required for entry through the door.
  5.  We will be implementing a *$50 “No Show Fee”* for no shows or cancellations if we are not notified at least 24 hours prior to your scheduled appointment.

Safety and Sanitization Precautions:

Frame Selections, Adjustments, Repairs and Dispensing:

 

Although there may be some changes to your normal visit to our office, we assure you that we are doing our best to follow all CDC, California Department of Public Health, California Optometric Association and local public health guidelines to keep our patients, staff and community safe without compromising our standard of excellence and quality during this time.

We ask that you all are mindful of the following precautions. We are all in this together. We look forward to SEEing you all soon!

Aloha Family Optometric Team